Behavioral strategy

 

“Behavioral strategy” refers to an approach to studying traditional strategic management problems, that aims to draw on evidence rather than assumptions about human behavior, in its theorizing [1, 2, 3]. Behavioral Strategy thus stresses the links between strategy and social/cognitive psychology, as well as methodologies that enable these linkages to be fruitfully exploited- such as qualitative research, lab experiments and agent based modelling- in addition to conventional large sample statistics.

 

[1] Powell TC, Lovallo D, Fox CR. 2011 Behavioral Strategy. Strategic Management Journal 32: 1369-1368. 

[2] Levinthal DA. 2011. A Behavioral Approach To Strategy - What's The Alternative? Strategic Management Journal 32: 1517-1523.

[3] https://strategicmanagement.net/ig/behavioral_strategy.php

This wiki page curates literature on behavioral strategy organized into a matrix of Concepts X Phenomena.

 

The link between concepts and phenomena occurs through the assumptions being used to characterize the decision making behavior of the agent or agents that are focal to the phenomenon.

This Wiki is maintained by PhD students from INSEAD with support from the faculty.

The curators of Behavioral Strategy Wiki:


Faculty Advisors: Henrich Greve and Phanish Puranam

Acknowledgements

 

We would like to thank the following colleagues for kindly contributing their reading lists for this wiki:

Acknowledgements

 

We would like to thank the following colleagues for kindly contributing their reading lists for this wiki:

Linda Argote (Carnegie Mellon Univ.)

Rich Bettis (Univ. of North Carolina)

Gino Cattani (New York Univ.)

Felipe Csaszar (Univ. of Michigan)

Jerker Denrell (Univ. of Warwick)

Kathleen Eisenhardt (Stanford Univ.)

Sydney Finkelstein (Dartmouth College)

Giovanni Gavetti (Dartmouth College)

Dan Levinthal (Wharton)

Hart Posen (Univ. of Wisconsin)

Website created with support from INSEAD Strategy Area & SMS Behavioral Strategy Interest Group Leadership

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